Lifestyle

INSIDE RA

Much more than jewelry and watches

Discover a little more about the world of Relojeria Alemana: events, places, people, news and lifestyle.

The wedding of the century
The big jewellery brands accompany royal households and celebrities on the most important day of their lives

Spring brings out not only good weather but also the wedding season. There are many couples choosing this season to plan their engagement, and there is no doubt that, between all details, wedding rings are the most iconic symbol of marriage.

In 2011, Christie’s auctioned off a private Bulgari collection belonging to Elizabeth Taylor, a fervent admirer of the firm. The Italian house recovered seven jewels in this auction, some of which were tokens of love actor Richard Burton gave the actress. One of them was the emerald brooch he gave her as an engagement gift in 1962. She wore it to her wedding and when she received the Oscar for best actress. Burton and Taylor met and fell in love in Rome, when they were shooting Cleopatra. Bulgari’s Condotti store in the city was one of the couple’s favourite hiding places. Burton used to say that ‘the only word Liz knows in Italian is Bulgari’.

Cartier has accompanied many women on the most important day of their lives. One of the most famous weddings in recent times was that of Prince William of England and Kate Middleton, on 29th April 2011. On that special day the Duchess of Cambridge wore a Cartier tiara that belonged to Queen Elizabeth. In her coronation year, Queen Elizabeth also asked Cartier to make a flower-shaped brooch with a pink diamond found in Tanzania in 1947, which was given to her as a wedding present when she was a princess.

On the night of her wedding to Prince Rainer in 1956, during the ball, Grace Kelly wore a platinum tiara set with round and baguette-cut diamonds, enhanced by three floral motifs with cabochon rubies. She also wore a necklace with three strands of alternating round and baguette-cut diamonds. Adornments created by Maison Cartier.

The wedding trousseau of Marie Bonaparte, for her marriage to Prince George of Greed and Denmark in 1907, contained a Cartier diamond tiara. The motif was olive leaves, a symbol of prosperity, luxury and wealth.

The Danish royal household has a predilection for one of its national firms, Ole Lynggaard. Above all Princess Mary, who uses special occasions to show of jewels by the brand, as in the case of the wedding of Princess Madeleine of Sweden and Christopher O’Neill, when she wore the midnight collection tiara.

Walking on words
Rediscovering Mallorca through the gaze of geniuses of literature like Jorge Luis Borges or Agatha Christie is possible with this cultural and literary project.

The ways of telling history and literature in Mallorca are becoming modernised thanks to works like Walking on Words, which has created an app for Smartphone and Tablet called “WoW! Mallorca literària”. This app enables tourists and residents to travel on routes all over the island using the artistic videos and literary quotes of great figures who once stayed on the island. The title “7 guided routes in paradise, if you can stand it”, refers to the invitation to Mallorca the American writer Gertrude Stein made in 1929 to the English writer Robert Graves, who would settle here years later. For anyone to whom the app may seem too “modern”, Walking on Words places a book at the disposal of the public giving the same details of each route or itinerary.

The first route presents twelve of the most emblematic places in Palma from the perspective of different authors, starting with the nooks and crannies of the Misericordia gardens, evoked by Bartomeu Rosselló-Pòrcel, and ending in the Cloister of Sant Francesc, described by Albert Camus as a place that inspires optimism. Outstanding from among the other figures who intervene along the route is the Archduke Ludwig Salvator, who speaks of sailors in Plaza de La Lonja as the sons of the sun and the sea, and also Jorge Luis Borges and Llorenç Villalonga, who show the cathedral and the area around it as characters with a life of their own.

The second, third and fourth routes transport us to the north of Mallorca, passing through the transparent waters of Cala Deià via the gaze of Anaïs Nin, through the Avenc de Son Pou, defined as a palace of fountains by Josep Capó and through the Roman theatre of Pol·lèntia, a stone muse for Miquel Costa i Llobera. Also remarkable are Miranda dels Lledoners, announced by George Sand; the library of the Archduke Ludwig Salvator in Son Marroig, admired by Jules Verne; the prosperous Mirador del Cementeri viewing platform that received Robert Graves; and the seafront promenade of Formentor, which served as inspiration for the famous Agatha Christie for her novel Problem at Pollensa Bay.

The fifth, sixth and seventh routes situate walkers in the south of the island, discovering places like the splendid Santuari de Cura with Ramon Llull, the magical Drach Caves with Paul Morand and the Casal of Pere Capellà, who inspired many with encouraging words.

Lovers of art and Mediterranean scenery are sure to feel fulfilled by these exquisite literary paths that still inspire new artists and writers today.

The ways of telling history and literature in Mallorca are becoming modernised thanks to works like Walking on Words, which has created an app for Smartphone and Tablet called “WoW! Mallorca literària”. This app enables tourists and residents to travel on routes all over the island using the artistic videos and literary quotes of great figures who once stayed on the island. The title “7 guided routes in paradise, if you can stand it”, refers to the invitation to Mallorca the American writer Gertrude Stein made in 1929 to the English writer Robert Graves, who would settle here years later. For anyone to whom the app may seem too “modern”, Walking on Words places a book at the disposal of the public giving the same details of each route or itinerary.

The first route presents twelve of the most emblematic places in Palma from the perspective of different authors, starting with the nooks and crannies of the Misericordia gardens, evoked by Bartomeu Rosselló-Pòrcel, and ending in the Cloister of Sant Francesc, described by Albert Camus as a place that inspires optimism. Outstanding from among the other figures who intervene along the route is the Archduke Ludwig Salvator, who speaks of sailors in Plaza de La Lonja as the sons of the sun and the sea, and also Jorge Luis Borges and Llorenç Villalonga, who show the cathedral and the area around it as characters with a life of their own.

The second, third and fourth routes transport us to the north of Mallorca, passing through the transparent waters of Cala Deià via the gaze of Anaïs Nin, through the Avenc de Son Pou, defined as a palace of fountains by Josep Capó and through the Roman theatre of Pol·lèntia, a stone muse for Miquel Costa i Llobera. Also remarkable are Miranda dels Lledoners, announced by George Sand; the library of the Archduke Ludwig Salvator in Son Marroig, admired by Jules Verne; the prosperous Mirador del Cementeri viewing platform that received Robert Graves; and the seafront promenade of Formentor, which served as inspiration for the famous Agatha Christie for her novel Problem at Pollensa Bay.

The fifth, sixth and seventh routes situate walkers in the south of the island, discovering places like the splendid Santuari de Cura with Ramon Llull, the magical Drach Caves with Paul Morand and the Casal of Pere Capellà, who inspired many with encouraging words.

Lovers of art and Mediterranean scenery are sure to feel fulfilled by these exquisite literary paths that still inspire new artists and writers today.

Healthy Bloggers
Eating well is easier than we imagine

Pre-summer season brings out to many people the concern of taking care of the diet, which is something we actually need to take care of during the year. These healthy bloggers, famous worldwide, show how eating healthy is easier than we think by sharing healthy recipes.

DELICIOUSLYELLA.COM

British blogger Ella Woodward was diagnosed with postural tachycardia syndrome and cured herself through diet. She did not know how to cook and loved sugar, and yet now her blog has more than 90,000 followers. She has also published a book, Deliciously Ella. Her motto: a healthy diet can change anybody’s life. ACOUPLECOOKS.COMSonja and Alex, a writer and a photographer, are a couple who live in Indianapolis. They both believe in the power of good food, so their blog is full of simple, healthy, tasty and sustainable flexitarian-type recipes, that is, mostly vegetarian, gluten-free or vegan recipes. A couple cooks is one of the 10 best health food blogs in the world according to Huffington Post. 

THEFIRSTMESS.COM

This blog is written beside the Niagara Falls. The completely vegan recipes and photos of the dishes by Laura Wright won the Best Food Blog Awards in 2014 by SAVEUR, and have been published in The Guardian. Under the slow food motto, she defends local produce from the garden to the table. 

RECETASSINLACTOSA.COM

Juanjo, or Chef Orielo, developed lactose intolerance at the age of 27 and since then created this blog with lactose-free recipes to help other people with the same problem, but also to present delicious dishes. Two years ago the blogwas considered the second best cookery blog in Spain by Canal Cocina (the cookery channel). 

LETITBECOSY.COM

Rocío Graves, who lives in Mallorca, uses her blog to help people who havetaken a step towards making a positive change in their daily habits, making them healthier. Her recipes are based on fruit and vegetables, either cooked or raw, and gluten-free products and those without refined sugars or flour.

Vermouth time
We trace out a triangle Madrid – Barcelona – Palma de Mallorca to discover the new temples of the “vermut”, or aperitif. 

For a while, perhaps, aperitifs ceased to be fashionable, albeit not to the point that they disappeared altogether from the traditional taverns. Like in the case of the legendary Bodega de la Ardosa, in Calle Colón in Madrid since 1892, or Quimet & Quimet in Barcelona (C. Poeta Cabanyes). The survival of bars like these has led us to resuscitate the classic Spanish expression for having an aperitif (usually involving a glass of vermouth), “hacer el vermut”, which has shaken off its dust and staleness to move masses of enthusiasts towards the bar every weekend.

So the aperitif is still present, and more so than every amongst people from 30 to 45 years old, who now have theirs in bars as modern as Lata Berna (C. Torrent de les Flors, 53 Barcelona) with over 50 creative tapas in Barcelona’s  Gracia neighbourhood. Or Morro Fi (C. Consell de Cent, 171), the most modern of them all and very fashionable in this city. It serves up beer, vermouth and preserves, and offers its own products too, as well as having some old soda bottles with highly original illustrations on them. In the Raval quarter the star is Cañete (C. Unió, 17), a bar that has received the Entrepreneur’s Kitchen Award, and which makes tapas like the fried moray or the fried aubergines with honey.

In Madrid, the Taberna La Carmencita (C. Libertad, 16), where the writers of the Generation of ’27 once drew inspiration, re-opened in 2013 after many years with its doors closed. It has now changed its concept and its cuisine is ecological and genuine in equal measure.

And we cannot give the postal address of the Vermutería Pop, also in Madrid. This is a company that organises pop-up events all over the capital under the slogan “the aperitif is sacred”. New vermouths are presented and given out for tasting in these parties.

In Palma de Mallorca, La Rosa Vermutería (C. de la Rosa, 5) is currently the reference point in the city, whether for an aperitif, for tasting professionally-cut ham, preserves, lunch or dinner. And then there are the local markets, Santa Catalina and Olivar, as well as the new San Juan Gastronomy Market, with key stalls such as La Vermutortillería (C. de la Emperatriz Eugenia, 6). La Vermutera organises events all over the island for enjoying aperitif time accompanied by the best vermouth, which take place in prestigious venues like Port Adriano.

TIPS YOU MUST KNOW ABOUT VERMOUTH

  • Although there are different varieties, vermouth contains white or red wine, alcohol, sugar and aromatic herbs such as cinnamon, camomile or cardamom. The so-called sweet vermouth contains more than 120g of sugar per litre, whilst the dry version contains less.

  • Italian vermouth is reddish and is produced in Turin. This is the case of Martini.

  • French vermouth is made with white wine and is typical in the south of France and the Alps. One well-known brand is Noilly Prat.

  • In Spain, the best-known vermouths are Yzaguirre, Casa Mariol, Zarro, Nordesia, Golfo or Txurrut, along with many others that have come into being after the ‘vermouth boom’.