Lifestyle

INSIDE RA

Much more than jewelry and watches

Discover a little more about the world of Relojeria Alemana: events, places, people, news and lifestyle.

Eco Hot Spot
The fashion of things biological, ecological and organic is taking hold of the island.

One of the most delightful places for filling up our ecological basket with local produce every week is at the market known as Plaza de los Patines (Pl. del Bisbe Berenguer de Palou) in Palma. Farmers and producers from the island gather here every Tuesday and Sunday. In addition to the 100% fresh, local produce there are also derivatives which they produce themselves, like dried fruit and nuts, wholemeal bread and carob flour or honey. For organic products we have this particular market in Palma, but the other municipalities of Mallorca also have a space for stalls of this type nowadays, like Porreres, which organises an Organic Farming Day every year.

The Slow food movement is very present in the establishment Loveat (C. Fabrica, 20), in the Santa Catalina neighbourhood, a place with plenty of charm where you can find local and fair trade products, which will also delivery your grocery basket to your home.

The leading organic supermarket chain in the entire country, Veritas (Pl. Comptat Roselló, 6), is in the centre of Palma, beside the Olivar Market, and has another establishment in Andratx. The wide assortment of all kinds of articles it stocks means you can do all your shopping here. It has a bakery selling freshly-baked bread and organic cakes.

Biokalma (Pl. Quartera, 9) is a grocer’s shop in the district of Sa Gerreria where you can find bulk products, bio and artisanal cosmetics, teas, fruit, vegetables, superfoods and natural supplements...

Nutriactiva (C. Velázquez, 7) reserves a space for organic food too, specialising in orthomolecular nutrition, dietary supplementation and phytotherapy.

Mercasana (C. Cecilio Metelo, 11), which stocks cleaning and hygiene products as well as food, has some cheeses, sobrasada, local fruit and vegetables, and a selection of home-produced breads. Nearby Yerbabuena (C. Jeroni Antich, 7) has local vegetables and fruit, and organic, vegan and macrobiotic foods as well as special diets. It stocks a wide variety of natural medicine products, vitamins and minerals. The store’s space is used to organise Pilates, yoga and meditation classes, and they have a naturist and massage service.

Pictures: LoVegano, Veritas and Loveat.

Patek Philippe, the last independent Genevan manufacture in a family hands

The Stern family has owned the Patek Philippe manufacture since 1932 when they became the sole shareholders of what is now the oldest independent Genevan manufacture owned by a single family. 

The freedom that only independent companies benefit from has meant that Henri, followed by Patek Philippe and now, Thierry Stern, have been able to lead Patek Philippe’s evolution and growth with determination, passion and loyalty towards the company’s founding values, which have prevailed since its creation in 1839.

This autonomy has also given them the privilege of being able to design a vision of the future, without being accountable to immediacy. The work carried out at the manufacture is done at its own pace - taking all the time in the world if need be - to make perfect timepieces or implement new technical developments.

Patek Philippe also benefits from total freedom of creation. The manufacture fully masters the watchmaking process, from design to production, controlling all the pieces from beginning to end, meeting high standards of quality and excellence.

Thierry Stern, President of Patek Philippe, is currently working on training and raising the awareness of future generations, so they will continue in the legacy of excellence, firmly devoted to the values that have forged a worldwide reputation.
 

Artisanal articles and gourmet products made on the island cross the borders of the five continents.

Oranges. The French discovered the quality of the sweet, juicy oranges of Sóller in the late 19th century, and started importing them to the south of France. Sobrasada. The porc negre (black pig) variety is made using an indigenous Mallorcan breed which was only found in Mallorca until the mid-19th century. This type of sobrassada bears the Controlled Quality seal and is found in specialist shops like Colmado de Santo Domingo, in Palma. Olive oil. Mallorca has its own denomination of origin and its own olive varieties such as arberquina, which gives rise to delicious oils like Aubocassa from Manacor, and Son Moragues is the only 100% organic Mallorcan oil. Ceramics. The Marratxí area is known as “terra del fang” – literally ‘clay country’ – because of its tradition of ceramic production, which is displayed every year at the Fira des Fang in Sant Marçal. Ensaimada. There is not a single bakery on the island that does not offer this 17th-century sweetmeat. The best way to try it is accompanied by almond ice cream or hot chocolate at Can Joan de s’Aigo in Palma. Footwear. Before the tourist boom, the footwear industry employed many Mallorcan families. As well as international companies like Camper or Lottusse, in Inca, home-grown designers create unique shoes, like Carmina Shoemaker, which has been producing artisanally since 1866. Prawns. The Mallorcan variety is the red prawn, and it is commonly fished in the Sóller and Andratx areas. Wine. Binissalem and Pla are the denominations of origin of Mallorca, held in high esteem the world over, with prestigious wineries like José Luis Ferrer, Ànima Negra, 4 Kilos or Macià Batle, among others. Espadrilles. This typical shoe made from esparto grass and cloth has travelled the entire world, but until very recently the best place to buy them was Alpargatería de La Concepción in Palma, where the mythical baskets or senalles are also found. Fabrics. ‘Tongues’ or llengües fabrics use the Oriental ikat technique and adorn the homes of all Mallorca in the form of curtains and upholstery. Family businesses such as Teixits Vicens in Pollensa continue to produce them, and have introduced their peculiar pattern to clothes and accessories. Almonds. Some companies have managed to innovate with what is the island’s number one nut. This is the case of Ametlla+, which offers a preparation made from almonds and other local ingredients to add a special touch to dishes, without any preservatives or colouring agents. Biscuits. The typical Inca biscuits are one of the most popular snacks. Gori de Muro offers original varieties with rosemary, and organic versions. Salt. The salt marshes of the beach of Es Trenc produce Flor de Sal, varieties of salt flakes presented mixed with local aromatic herbs, black olives, hibiscus, rose… Glass. Glass is also one of the island’s most striking artisanal products, with brands like La Fiore, Gordiola or Menestralia. Gin. In the age of gin and tonic as a star cocktail, Mallorca could not be left behind. Gin Suau is the indigenous premium quality London Dry gin.

They left their mark.
Celebrities who made a lifestyle or a way of being and dressing fashionable.

Elizabet Taylor and fine jewellery. Enamoured of Bulgari, her jewellery collection is any woman’s dream.

Coco Chanel and pearls. They were Mademoiselle’s passion and she wore them with any kind of look, from the most formal to the sportiest style.

James Dean and jeans. This garment was the hallmark of the star of Rebel without a Cause, along with his Ray-Ban glasses and black turtleneck sweater.

Audrey Hepburn and glamour. She really didn’t need much to be perfect – class oozed from her in every updo, in her French fringe and her black eyeliner.

Brigitte Bardot and volume. A pioneer of the boho chic trend and tousled bed head hair with plenty of body.

David Bowie and psychedelics. True to psychedelics, his style was marked by his first wife, Angie Barnett. As a legacy, he left the jacket with horizontal stripes and big lapels.

Cary Grant and the tuxedo. Nobody has ever worn a tuxedo in the big Hollywood parties like this gentleman of the silver screen.

Jacqueline Kennedy and elegance. “America’s widow” created the fashion of geometrically-cut dresses, two-piece suits and the pillbox hat.